Category Archives: Baking

Low sugar baking #2: End of summer plum cake

I’ve been spurred out of my posting lethargy by the realization that this recipe will soon be out of season (may be on its way out right now, even). Last Saturday┬ámorning I went out with a friend along a nearby run/bike/hike trail and it was starting to feel decidedly fall-like–gray sky and a tinge of moisture in the air. But enough of the weather. Plums.

This recipe evolved from a wonderful pear cake recipe that I first discovered several years ago. I started off by tweaking the batter (wheat germ! less sugar! maybe some other things…), but stuck with the original fruit of pears. This year, when plums started showing up at the market, it occurred to me that they might be a perfect substitute for pears. When I went back to look up the original pear cake recipe while writing this post, I saw that it has started life as a plum cake, so…there you go. Plums are indeed, substitutable for pears, in some instances. I changed up the spices I had been using a little too, adding a little of the mixed spice (aka Christmas pudding spice) that M. loves. Most of the sweetness in this cake comes from the plum juice seeping into the batter as it bakes, and the batter itself has just a few spoonfuls of sugar. While I normally shy away from the idea of labeling sweet baked goods as “healthy enough for breakfast”, I think this recipe comes pretty darned close.

After I made this plum cake for the first time last month, I realized it was M.’s total first exposure, as he’d somehow missed all the previous pear versions. He sometimes objects to the use of whole wheat flour, so I thought he might dismiss this cake as a little too healthy. Fortunately, my fears turned out to be baseless–maybe the mixed spice?

Lower Sugar Plum Cake
makes one shallow 10″ cake

Ingredients
1/2 c. unsalted butter, plus a little for greasing the pan
2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp milk
2 eggs
1 c. whole wheat flour
1/4 c. wheat germ
1/2 tsp mixed spice* (see note below)
1 tsp. baking powder
pinch of salt
12 plums or Italian prunes, halved and pits removed

*Mixed spice is fairly similar to pumpkin pie spice, so you could substitute in a pinch. To make your own, combine a 3:3:2:1:1:1:1 ratio of allspice, nutmeg, mace, cloves, ginger, cinnamon, and coriander.

Method

1. Preheat oven to 350F, lightly grease and flour a 10″ tart pan.

2. Cream together the butter, sugar, and milk. Gently beat the eggs into the mixture.

3. Combine the flour, wheat germ, mixed spice, baking powder, and salt.

4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet in 3-4 batches. The batter should be fairly thick and even semi-solid.

5. Pour batter into tart pan and press fruit into the top of the batter. Bake for 40-50 minutes, or until cake is browned and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow to cool before serving.

Low sugar baking #1: Ginger softies

As promised (or threatened), I’m working on a little series of posts focused on baking with less sugar, which, if you’ve perused this blog much at all, you probably know is a quasi-obsession of mine. My goal with this series is not just to share recipes, but also some general tips for using less sugar, and to also describe some of my less-successful attempts at sugar reduction (so you don’t do the same thing!).
So for the first post, let’s start off with a few of the key things to remember when you start to tinker around with a recipe to reduce the sugar content.

You don’t need much sugar to make things sweet
Seriously. Many commercial baked goods use a lot more sugar (or whatever their sweetener of choice is) than is needed to achieve sweetness. I have found that I can usually use less than half sugar called for in a “regular” version of something and still have the final result taste perfectly sweet. Also, with less sugar in a recipe, other flavors (vanilla, spices, etc.) become more prominent, giving a more complex tasting experience. Elana just happened to mention the same thing in a post she wrote earlier this week, so you know it’s not just me. However…

Sugar does affect texture and structure
One of the characteristics that sugar brings to baked goods is, broadly speaking, crispness or crunch. In some cases, the sugar is critical to the structure of the finished product (think meringue kisses, florentines, etc.). I don’t spend much time trying to re-make recipes that really need sugar for structure. Instead, I focus on recipes where a slight change in texture is not going to be such a problem. For example, today’s ginger cookie recipe is softer, less chewy, and more cake-like than a ginger cookie from the local store or bakery, but it is still delicious, full of spice, and completely recognizable as a cookie.

Is there a “best” or “healthy” sweetener?
My personal opinion is that for the most part, whole fresh fruit is the “best” sugar and the only sweetener that can really be considered “healthy”. After that, I believe it’s better to simply focus on using less sweetener, no matter the source. To that end, I use the sweetener I think will work best in a recipe (for reasons of either taste or texture), be that fruit, white sugar, brown sugar, honey, dates, or molasses. A while back, health-bent wrote an extensive post about sugar vs. more “natural” sweeteners and it really captures a lot of my thoughts on the topic.

And now, a recipe! Today’s recipe is a pretty easy one, a lower sugar version of the classic ginger cookie. Ginger cookies generally rely on two sweeteners: regular white sugar and molasses. Since molasses does actually lend a distinctive flavor I focus more on slashing the white sugar content. This recipe has 1/4 c. each of sugar and molasses–most recipes with a similar yield would use around least a cup of sugar, plus 1/4 or 1/3 c. of molasses. What the cookies do not skimp on is the spices: each bite is bursting with ginger flavor, plus undertones of cinnamon and cloves. I hope they will become a favorite in your baking repertoire!

Ginger Softies
makes about 30 plump 1″ cookies

Ingredients
2 c. white whole wheat or all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 tbsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp each ground cinnamon and cloves
1/2 c butter
1/4 c sugar
1/4 c molasses
1/4 c milk
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Method

Sift together flour, baking soda, salt, and spices. In a separate bowl, cream together butter and sugar. Stir in molasses, then work the dry ingredients into the mix in 3-4 batches. Add milk and vanilla extract and combine.

Preheat oven to 350F. While the oven is heating, pinch off ~1″ lumps of dough, roll into balls, and place on cookie sheets. When oven is heated, place cookies in oven and bake for 10-12 minutes. Remove cookies from oven and allow to cool, then enjoy fresh or store in an airtight container. Cookies will keep at room temperature for several days.

Olive oil shortbread with lemon and rosemary

Last weekend I came home to find a bag full of lemons and limes by the back door. Can I just brag about how awesome it is to have friends who leave you gifts like this? Very awesome. I always love to have these little citrus fruits on hand. A quick squeeze of lemon or lime is perfect in so many things. But when I have a bounty of lemons like I did last week, it’s time to do more than just squeeze a little lemon over my salad or into a water glass (plus, the best way of ensuring future citrus gifts is to follow up with baked good gift, no?)

And so, my lemon bounty led me to this bright little shortbread. I had been tinkering with a recipe for olive oil shortbread with rosemary, and the addition of lemon juice and zest was just what it needed for a light and summer-appropriate flavor. A mix of cornmeal, and white whole wheat flour makes for a wholesome and rustic crumb. Mostly I have been enjoying these shortbread wedges alongside an afternoon cup of Darjeeling, but on hot evenings when I crave a cool glass of almond milk after dinner, it turns out that a little shortbread is quite nice in that setting also.

This recipe is also another one of my low-sugar experiments; just 1/4 c. for the whole recipe. I’ve been thinking of doing an occasional series of posts on my strategies for baking less sugary treats, some of the things I’ve tried that have worked well (or not), recipe makeovers, that kind of thing. Thoughts? Interest? Just post the shortbread recipe already?

Olive oil shortbread with lemon and rosemary
makes one 9″ pan of shortbread (8-12 wedges)

Ingredients
1/2 c. olive oil
1 1/2 c. white whole wheat flour (or a 50/50 mix of whole wheat and all-purpose flours)
1/4 c. yellow cornmeal
1 tbsp. flax meal
1/4 c. sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 c. lemon juice
grated zest of 1 lemon
2 tbsp fresh rosemary

Method
Preheat oven to 300F and grease a 9″ pan. In a food processor fitted with the metal s-blade, combine and thoroughly blend all ingredients except the rosemary. Add rosemary and process for 10 seconds. Press dough into greased pan and slice into 8-12 wedges, depending on your preference. Use a fork to make decorative pricks in the surface.

Bake for 35-45 minutes, until just beginning to brown. Turn off heat in oven and leave shortbread to sit for 15 minutes before removing.

Sesame nori crackers (vegan, gluten free)

Sesame nori crackers

I love reading other food blogs. Often, it’s just because I love seeing (and trying) other people’s great recipes. But sometimes another food blog also kicks me off towards trying something new of my own. Case in point, last week Gena put together a great post on packing your own healthy and vegan lunch. The post included some photos and descriptions of her lunches, and one of the items was described as a raw cracker with nori. I’d been having salty crunchy foods on the brain all week, and the mention of nori immediately sent my mind over to those little puffed rice snacks that sometimes come wrapped in nori. Obviously, my Friday afternoon was going to be spent making some nori crackers (un-raw variety).

Sesame nori crackers

I’m doing a pretty strict elimination diet right now in a bid to wean myself off sugar (for the curious, I’m using the diet plan outlined in Alejandro Junger’s book Clean as the template), so crackers with wheat flour were going to be right out. Also, no eggs to bind things together. I’ve tried making vegan crackers with straight almond flour in the past and they’ve always lacked structural stability (I probably need to use a finer grind of almond flour instead of cheaping out and making my own all the time). I went looking for some other ideas and lo and behold, another of my favorite bloggers has a recipe for vegan gluten free crackers that use a mix of rice flour and almond meal. I didn’t have any rice flour, but I did just become the proud owner of this massive container of rice protein powder. That could work, right? High protein, salty, crunchy snack food, here I come!

It took a little playing around, but I did finally wind up with a cracker with that salty, tangy flavor I was going for. Using the rice protein powder also worked out really well–the crackers weren’t as grainy as some of my previous all-almond crackers, and they held together really well too (I’m sure the flax meal also contributes to that). They aren’t quite like crackers made from wheat (obviously), but I’d say they compare favorably with any of the store-bought gluten free crackers I’ve tried. P

Sesame nori crackers

Sesame nori crackers
Makes aproximately 30 crackers

Ingredients
1/2 c. unflavored brown rice protein powder
1/2 c. raw almonds
2 tbsp ground flax seed
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp sesame oil
3 tbsp tamari sauce
1/4 c. + 1 tbsp water
1/4 c. sesame seeds
2 sheets dried nori seaweed, cut into small strips or pieces

Method
1. In a food processor fitted with the metal S-blade, combine all ingredients except the sesame seeds and nori. Grind until mixture takes on the consistency of a thick paste. Add the sesame seeds and incorporate with a few quick pulses. Remove dough from processor and allow to sit for at least 15 minutes (this step will allow the flax meal to absorb excess liquid and make the dough less sticky).

2. Press dough out onto a sheet of parchment paper, forming a rough rectangle about 3/4″ thick. Spread 1/3 of the seaweed pieces across the dough, then fold dough into thirds. Repeat this step twice more to incorporate the remaining nori. Continue pressing and folding dough until nori is incorporated throughout dough.

3. Preheat oven to 400F. Layer a second piece of parchment paper across the top of the dough and roll to desired thickness (mine were a little over 1/8″). Use a butter knife or a pizza cutter to cut dough into squares. Transfer the bottom sheet of parchment paper, with crackers on it, to a baking sheet. Bake at 400F for 8-12 minutes, until crackers are slightly browned. Remove from oven and allow too cool. Crackers will firm up and become crisper with cooling.

White bean and butternut bake (gluten free)

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M. and I are back on the west coast, after a relaxing week visiting family and old friends back in NC. We woke up on New Year’s Eve at 4AM, hopped a non-stop flight, and arrived home just before midday. Needless to say, we were completely knackered and did not stay up to ring in the New Year. But we did manage to polish off the last of this casserole (stored in the freezer after the November batch cook day) for our final meal of 2013.

M. and I both love cheesy baked casseroles and lasagnas, and this dish was devised as a healthier twist on that favorite theme. I blended ricotta with white beans to create a creamy filling, layered it with sauteed onion and slices of butternut squash, then topped with parmesan and put the whole concoction into the oven. I also used this recipe to experiment a bit with the sage + squash combination I seem to find popping up everywhere these days. I was initially dubious, but after having made this casserole a few times, I’m definitely realizing I should have gotten over those doubts earlier! It’s an unexpected but delightful taste pairing.

I made this casserole using our 12″ cast iron skillet as the baking vessel, but you can also use a 13 x 9″ covered baking dish as a substitute if you prefer.

White Bean and Butternut Bake (gluten free)
serves 8-10

Ingredients
1 butternut squash (~4 lbs), peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2″ slices
2 c. cooked white beans
1 c. ricotta cheese
1 tsp salt
8-10 twists of freshly ground black pepper
2 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion, cut into 1/4″ dice
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried sage leaves
4 oz. parmesan cheese, grated

Method
1. Place squash slices in a microwave safe dish with 2 tbsp water, cover, and microwave on high power for 6 minutes.

2. Combine white beans, ricotta, pepper, and salt in a food processor fitted with the metal s-blade, and process until smooth. Taste, and add more salt or pepper if needed.

3. In 12″ skillet, heat the olive oil. Saute onion for 12-15 minutes over medium heat, until beginning to brown and caramelize slightly. Add the garlic and sage and saute for 3-5 minutes more. Remove onions from pan and begin oven preheating to 400F

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4. Lightly oil the skillet or baking dish, then arrange a layer of squash on the bottom. Top with 1/3 of the bean and ricotta mixture, and 1/2 of the onions. Repeat this layering twice more, omitting the onion on the final layer. If there are any remaining squash slices, arrange them on top of the dish, then top with the grated parmesan.

5. Bake, covered for 45 minutes. Uncover and continue baking until parmesan is beginning to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool for at least 10 minutes before serving.

Tahini and lime cookies (vegan, gluten free)

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This weekend, I was doing some baking, and M. requested “paleo” cookies. These little morsels, a remake of a favorite recipe from Vegan Cookies Invade your Cookie Jar, were the result. If the flavor combination is sounding a little odd to you, let me assure you that actually, lime and tahini in cookie form is pretty awesome. Also, I’ve practically convinced myself that they’re seasonally appropriate: citrus is abundant in winter, and tahini, being Middle Eastern, is totally something that might have been eaten by shepherds gathering around the manger in Bethlehem. Right? Maybe? At any rate, these cookies are moist, lightly sweetened, and perfect for pairing with and afternoon or evening cup of tea.

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I considered calling these cookies “sugar free”, but ultimately decided not to. If you draw your “sugar” line at table sugar, then feel free to consider this recipe sugar free. Personally, I always feel a bit weird calling a fruit-sweetened dessert “sugar free”, because fruit does contain sugar. So instead I’ll give the long form: these are sweetened with dates, and they have about half as many sugar calories as most “conventional” cookie recipes, plus a bit more fiber and protein. Okay, spiel over. Back to the recipe. It’s really good, I promise.

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Tahini and Lime cookies (vegan, gluten free)
makes 2-3 dozen cookies

Ingredients
1/2 c. coconut oil
1/2 c. tahini
12 dates, pitted and roughly chopped
grated zest of 2 limes
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 c. lime juice
3/4 c. almond milk
1 c. coconut flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
4 tbsp sesame seeds

Method
1. Sift together coconut flour, salt, and baking powder.

2. In a food processor fitted with the metal s-blade, blend together oil, tahini, lime zest, and dates until dates are fully incorporated (there will probably still be some brown flecks.

3. Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl. Using a hand mixer (or, if you don’t have one, a wooden spoon), incorporate the remaining wet ingredients into the mixture. Add the flour mixture, a few large spoonfuls at a time. When all the flour has been incorporated, the dough should be moist and somewhat sticky (if you pick up a piece, pinch it, and then pull your fingers apart, some dough should stay stuck to your hands). If needed, add more almond milk to the mixture, one tablespoon at time.

4. Start oven preheating to 350F and line two baking pans with parchment paper. Place sesame seeds on a small plate or saucer. Form dough into approximately 1″ balls. Press each ball into the sesame seeds, then place on the baking tray, seed side up.

5. Bake at 350F for 14-16 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool before eating (if you can!)

Sweet potato tartlets with gingerbread crust (vegan, gluten/grain free)

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Here’s a confession for you: I’ve not done much of anything to prepare for Thanksgiving this year. Instead of preparing a traditional holiday spread, M. and I will be heading off with a group of friends to do some camping up north(ish). Thanksgiving camping has become something of a tradition for us, though this is the first time we’re making it a group outing. We will for sure be having some good food, but there’s no way I’m lugging a turkey or even a few pies several miles through the “wilderness” to get to our campsite. So, no traditional Thanksgiving dinner for us this year!

Still, I’m not totally out of the Thanksgiving loop, and I would have to be living under a rock to have missed all the recipes floating around the internet, not to mention the pumpkin pie spice smells being pumped into the grocery store. While I love a slice of pumpkin pie as much as anyone, lately I’ve been feeling more drawn to its neglected Southern cousin, the sweet potato (or really, yam) pie. And thus, these sweet potato tarts came into being. The gingerbread crust is something I’ve been fascinated with every since I was introduced to the concept five or so years back. This version is both vegan and gluten/grain free, relying on soaked almonds to form the base material. Molasses and a hefty dose of ginger, plus a few notes of cinnamon and cloves finish things off. The filling is also relatively low on sugar: sweet potato and two dates is all you need!

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Sweet potato tartlets with gingerbread crust

makes 12 tartlets (I used a 1.75″ diameter, like this tin)

Ingredients
For the crust
1 c. almonds, soaked overnight and drained
1 T molasses
1 T ginger
1 T coconut oil
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp cloves

For the filling
1 c mashed sweet potato
1 T ground flax seed
1 T almond milk
2 tsp coconut oil
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
2 Deglet Noor dates (I use the Hadley brand, they seem to be pretty solid–nice and moist!)
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Method
1. In a food processor fitted with the metal S-blade, combine all crust ingredients. Process into a thick dough/paste. A slightly “grainy” consistency from the nuts is fine, but there should not be large nut chunks.

2. Grease a mini muffin pan and start oven preheating to 350F. Press dough into muffin cups. Bake for 12 minutes.

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3. While the crust is baking, prepare the filling. Using the same food processor (you should scrape out any large amounts of leftover crust, but a few smears clinging to the side are no big deal), blend together the filling ingredients.

4. Fill the muffin cups. I find this step works best if you fill an icing bag with the filling and pipe it in.

5. Bake for another 12-14 minutes, until filling is just barely beginning to brown on top. Remove from oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes.

To remove from pan, gently slide a knife around the top edge of each tartlet. They should then be ready to pop right out.

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