Category Archives: Gluten Free

Post-run mango smoothie

Since I’ve been getting more serious about running lately (that first half marathon? DONE!), I’ve started to pay more attention to pre- and post-run fueling. One thing I keep reading is that following a hard run, it’s important to eat quickly (within 30 minutes) and ideally to eat a roughly 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein. So after my long Saturday run, I’ve been whipping up a smoothie with lots of fruit (carbs)!, spinach (potassium keeps muscle cramps at bay!) and some protein powder (protein!). One of my favorites is this green mango smoothie:

With just one fruit, this smoothie comes together quickly–most weekends I even have time to prep it before I leave for my run, so I come home to a nice cold smoothie on the top shelf of the fridge. Absolute bliss after a few hot and sweaty miles. I actually used not to be a big mango fan, but I’ve come around to them big time this year as our local market kept popping up with these great deals on mangoes by the box. I’ll try anything once if it’s a bargain, you know?

I’ve also experimented with making this smoothie a full-on meal replacement by adding a little more fat, my two favorites are coconut milk (makes for a really creamy texture), or a raw nut butter (almond and cashew are particularly nice). This smoothie also keeps in the fridge for a day or two, so I sometimes like to make one on a weeknight and split it in two for part of an easy weekday breakfast. Or, after an especially grueling run, it’s the perfect side to something more substantial:


My hacked version of Kumera + Kale latkes with poached egg, using frozen spinach (instead of kale) and mashed sweet potatoes (instead of grated).

Yum.

Green mango smoothie
Serves one tired runner

1 large mango, peeled and cut into rough chunks
1 tbsp each pea and rice protein powder (or 2 tbsp protein powder of choice)
2-3 large handfuls baby spinach
2 tbsp flax meal
1-2 c. water
Optional add-ins for a meal-sized smoothie: 1/3 c. full fat coconut milk, 1-2 tbsp raw almond or cashew butter.

Combine mango, protein powder, spinach, coconut milk or nut butter (if using), and 1 c. water in a food processor or blender. Blend until smooth. Add additional water as needed to achieve desired consistency. Drink immediately or allow to chill in the fridge. If you leave the smoothie to chill, the flax will soak up some of the water and you may get more of a mango pudding. Enjoy the thicker version, or thin out a little by stirring a bit more water into the mix.

Two pestos

Do you remember how I was growing tomatoes on my patio last year? Probably not. No problem, just know that there were tomatoes, and that they were wonderful, but a little crowded in their pots. This year, M. and I decided that we wanted to do tomatoes again, but that a pot upgrade would be needed. Which left me with four formerly tomato-ed pots to put to good use. I decided it was high time to start an herb garden:

Just a small one. Some arugula (not an herb, I know), and two kinds of basil. One a standard sweet basil, the other a fragrant and purple tinged Thai variety. Both plants have been going crazy since I transplanted them into the pots (which I filled with my first batch of finished compost!). I’ve been plucking off a few leaves here and there for salads, omelets, or garnishes, but recently I realized that my plants were in need of a serious harvest. So I got picking:

Then I got down to the business of making pesto. Since I had two kinds of basil, two kinds of pesto! The first is a classic Italian style, made with sweet basil and walnuts (in lieu of pine nuts, which have gotten way too pricey in recent years. Sorry, pine nuts). The second is a bit of a sacrilege: I took the concept of pesto, but gave it an Asian twist, using Thai basil, peanuts, sesame oil, and a touch of tamari.

Right now my favorite way of using pesto is to dollop a spoonful onto one of the vegetable+legume+grain bowls I’ve been eating for dinner most nights. I’ve also been using the classic pesto as a dressing for sauteed green beans and tomatoes, and either recipe is an easy way to upgrade most grilled or sauteed vegetables to a stellar side dish. And if you need more ideas, I’ll be sharing a few recipes that make use of these pestos later this week.

Two pestos
Each recipe makes between 1/2 and 3/4 c.

Classic Pesto
1 oz sweet basil leaves (about 1.5 oz with stems)
1/4 c. olive oil
1/4 c. walnut pieces
1 clove garlic, peeled
1/2 tsp salt, or to taste

Thai peanut pesto
1 oz thai basil leaves (about 1.5 oz with stems)
1/4 c. sesame oil
1/4 c. roasted salted peanuts
1 clove garlic, peeled
1 tbsp tamari or soy sauce

Method

Place all ingredients in a food processor fitted with the metal S-blade. Process for 30 seconds, scrape down the sides, and process for another 10 seconds or so. If a thinner pesto is desired, add more oil, 1-2 tbsp at a time.

Pesto can be frozen, or will keep for up to a week in the fridge.

Lavender biscuits (Recipe Redux)

June’s Recipe Redux challenge was flowers. As soon as I saw the theme, I knew what I wanted to experiment with: a floral, oh-so-slightly sweet twist on the high-protein crackers I’ve been making on and off since January, when I devised my Sesame nori crackers. I’ve come up with several different savory versions, but had been thinking it would be nice to have an option to pair with an afternoon cup of tea (and a novel–my current choice is The Goddess Chronicle, which so far has managed to suck me in pretty thoroughly).

Lavender seemed like the perfect addition to the mix, so I bicycled over to the local natural foods store to get some food-grade dried flowers, and got busy. These biscuits have a lovely crumbly texture, and a light, subtle flavor. There are definite coconut undertones, which mix with vanilla and lavender for a lovely afternoon treat.

I’ve been on a slow but steady mission to eliminate (or really, drastically cut) sugar out of my diet for a while now. I was hoping the coconut flour and oil in this recipe might be just enough sweetness on its own for this recipe, but it really did benefit from the addition of those two dates to the mix. If you are determined to make a completely sugar-free version, a pinch or two of stevia could probably be used instead.

Lavender biscuits
makes 20 biscuits

Ingredients
1/4 c. coconut oil
2 dates, finely chopped
1/2 c. blanched almonds
1/2 c. pea protein powder
1/4 c. coconut flour
1 tbsp. ground psyllium husk
1 egg
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 cup water
1 tbsp dried lavender buds

Method

1. In a food processor fitted with the metal S-blade, combine the dates and coconut oil, and process until blended. Add the almonds, protein powder, coconut flour, and psyllium husk, and process to a coarse meal. Add the egg, vanilla extract, and water, and process until the dough begins to stick together in a cohesive lump.

2. Remove dough from food processor and place on a sheet of parchment paper. Flatten slightly, and sprinkle about half of the lavender buds on top. Work the lavender into the dough by folding and flattening several times, then flatten the dough slightly and repeat with the remaining lavender.

3. Preheat oven to 350F. When the lavender has been worked into the dough, cover with a second sheet to parchment paper and roll the dough to ~1/4″ thickness. Using a 2″ round cutter, cut out rounds of dough and place on a baking tray. The recipe should yield ~20 biscuits. Bake for 15-18 minutes, until biscuits are lightly browned. Remove from oven and allow to cool before removing from the tray.

Sugar-free chocolate banana pie

Anyone who’s seen me cook from a recipe can attest that I am always making substitutions. Especially when I get it into my head that I want to make something now. So it was with this chocolate banana pie. I had just gotten a copy of the Paleo Chocolate Lover’s Cookbook and was flipping through it. A picture of chocolate hazelnut mini-tarts caught my eye and I just had to make them. Except that I was out of hazelnuts, I wasn’t quite sure where to find coconut butter locally, and (perhaps most crucially), there was no chocolate in the studio. Cocoa powder only. And a bowl of bananas. Not to be denied my desire for a chocolate dessert, I started experimenting.

In the end, the crust in this pie is a fairly close copy of the one used in the inspiration recipe, a mix of walnuts and coconut flour. I used a fresh apple instead of applesauce, and added a little orange zest to brighten things up. This crust is a little finer and lighter than the coarse ground almond crust I have used for tarts in the past (such as last summer’s recurring peach and blackberry), it tastes less obviously “alternative”, which may or may not matter to you. I was initially a little concerned about using walnuts in the crust–I thought there might be a bit of an aftertaste. However, multiple rounds of baking have laid my fears to rest.

The filling for this pie is incredibly easy: just dump everything in the food processor and go. The result is creamy, dark, and chocolatey. It sets up very quickly also, making this a great semi-last minute dessert (assuming, of course, that you have all the ingredients to hand!).

Chocolate Banana Pie
Makes 1 10″ tart, enough for 6-8

Crust
1 c. walnuts
1/2 c. coconut flour
1 apple, cored and coarsely chopped
2 tbsp coconut oil
grated zest of 1 orange

Filling
4 bananas, peeled and cut into 1-2″ pieces
3/4 c. cocoa powder
1 1/4 c. almond milk
1 tsp. vanilla extract

1. In a food processor, combine the walnuts and coconut flour. Process to a fine meal. Add the apple, coconut oil, and orange zest, and process until the mixture has reached a uniform consistency. The result should be a slightly moist dough.

2. Preheat oven to 350F. Press crust into a 10″ tart pan. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool while you make the banana filling.

3. Combine all filling ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Depending on the size of your bananas, you may wish to add up to 1/4 c. additional almond milk.

4. Pour the filling into the crust and spread evenly. Place in refrigerator and leave for at least 15 minutes to allow filling to firm up.

Sesame nori crackers (vegan, gluten free)

Sesame nori crackers

I love reading other food blogs. Often, it’s just because I love seeing (and trying) other people’s great recipes. But sometimes another food blog also kicks me off towards trying something new of my own. Case in point, last week Gena put together a great post on packing your own healthy and vegan lunch. The post included some photos and descriptions of her lunches, and one of the items was described as a raw cracker with nori. I’d been having salty crunchy foods on the brain all week, and the mention of nori immediately sent my mind over to those little puffed rice snacks that sometimes come wrapped in nori. Obviously, my Friday afternoon was going to be spent making some nori crackers (un-raw variety).

Sesame nori crackers

I’m doing a pretty strict elimination diet right now in a bid to wean myself off sugar (for the curious, I’m using the diet plan outlined in Alejandro Junger’s book Clean as the template), so crackers with wheat flour were going to be right out. Also, no eggs to bind things together. I’ve tried making vegan crackers with straight almond flour in the past and they’ve always lacked structural stability (I probably need to use a finer grind of almond flour instead of cheaping out and making my own all the time). I went looking for some other ideas and lo and behold, another of my favorite bloggers has a recipe for vegan gluten free crackers that use a mix of rice flour and almond meal. I didn’t have any rice flour, but I did just become the proud owner of this massive container of rice protein powder. That could work, right? High protein, salty, crunchy snack food, here I come!

It took a little playing around, but I did finally wind up with a cracker with that salty, tangy flavor I was going for. Using the rice protein powder also worked out really well–the crackers weren’t as grainy as some of my previous all-almond crackers, and they held together really well too (I’m sure the flax meal also contributes to that). They aren’t quite like crackers made from wheat (obviously), but I’d say they compare favorably with any of the store-bought gluten free crackers I’ve tried. P

Sesame nori crackers

Sesame nori crackers
Makes aproximately 30 crackers

Ingredients
1/2 c. unflavored brown rice protein powder
1/2 c. raw almonds
2 tbsp ground flax seed
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp sesame oil
3 tbsp tamari sauce
1/4 c. + 1 tbsp water
1/4 c. sesame seeds
2 sheets dried nori seaweed, cut into small strips or pieces

Method
1. In a food processor fitted with the metal S-blade, combine all ingredients except the sesame seeds and nori. Grind until mixture takes on the consistency of a thick paste. Add the sesame seeds and incorporate with a few quick pulses. Remove dough from processor and allow to sit for at least 15 minutes (this step will allow the flax meal to absorb excess liquid and make the dough less sticky).

2. Press dough out onto a sheet of parchment paper, forming a rough rectangle about 3/4″ thick. Spread 1/3 of the seaweed pieces across the dough, then fold dough into thirds. Repeat this step twice more to incorporate the remaining nori. Continue pressing and folding dough until nori is incorporated throughout dough.

3. Preheat oven to 400F. Layer a second piece of parchment paper across the top of the dough and roll to desired thickness (mine were a little over 1/8″). Use a butter knife or a pizza cutter to cut dough into squares. Transfer the bottom sheet of parchment paper, with crackers on it, to a baking sheet. Bake at 400F for 8-12 minutes, until crackers are slightly browned. Remove from oven and allow too cool. Crackers will firm up and become crisper with cooling.

Curried red lentil soup

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Come January, I always seem to be craving foods that are a little lighter, “cleaner”, healthier, whatever. This soup is one result of those cravings. I made a big crockpot of it on New Year’s day, had some friends over for dinner, and served it alongside a salad of mixed greens and lemon tahini dressing. I cooked up another batch today, so it seemed an appropriate time to share the recipe.

I can’t speak for everyone, but I find lentils, while delicious, cheap, and nutritious, can get a little heavy and stodgy on their own. This recipe breaks up the lentils with a slew of vegetables, then fires and brightens with the addition of Thai chilis and a dash of lime juice. Coconut milk adds a creamy finish that separates the dish from your stereotypical cheap student fare (without actually breaking the grocery budget, excellent). If you’re feeling yourself held a little too closely in winter’s grip, this soup is sure to loosen it’s hold with a shot of delicious at the dinner table.

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Curried red lentil soup
Serves 8-10

Ingredients
3 c. dried red lentils
4 tbsp olive oil
2 medium onions, cut into 1/2″ dice
4 cloves garlic
2 carrots, peeled and cut into 3/4″ dice
3 zucchini or yellow squash, cut into 3/4″ dice
2 stalks of celery, cut into 3/4″ dice
3 Thai chili peppers, finely diced
2 tbsp yellow curry powder
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp coriander
8 c. vegetable broth
1 14-oz can coconut milk.
Juice of one lime

Method

1. Soak lentils in cold water overnight (you can skip this step, plan on extending the cooking time by 10-20 minutes, and adding additional liquid). When ready to make the soup, place lentils in a large soup or stockpot

2. In a large skillet, heat 2 tbsp of the olive oil to medium heat. Saute the onions until soft and slightly translucent, 6-10 minutes. Add the garlic and saute 2-3 minutes more. Transfer onion and garlic mixture to stockpot with lentils.

3. Add 1 tbsp oil to skillet, saute carrots for 8-12 minutes, until soft and with a few browned edges. Transfer to stockpot. Repeat with zucchini and celery.

4. Add chilis, curry powder, cumin, and coriander. Turn heat to medium and stir all ingredients together until evenly coated with spices. Continue stirring for 2 minutes more. Add broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook soup, covered, for 25-30 minutes, until lentils are cooked through and soft. Add coconut milk and lime juice and allow soup to heat through. Remove from heat and serve.

Tahini lemon dressing

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There’s something about having a 4lb jar of tahini in your fridge. You just start wanting to add it to everything. Hummus (no surprise there), cookies (a little less typical), and today, salad dressing.

Normally I’m not a huge salads-in-winter person, but when the produce market keeps putting 3lbs for $3 bags of salad greens front and center at the entrance, well…habits can change.

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This dressing is a riff on a recipe that I first saw in my old standby, Vegan with A Vengeance, but I’ve played around with the preparation and simplified things by using the microwave rather than the stovetop to “cook” the garlic. All you purists out there, use the stovetop, but I like the speed and ease that the microwave provides.

Tahini lemon dressing
makes ~1/2c. of dressing

Ingredients
1 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, crushed or finely minced
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
juice of 1 lemon (~2 tbsp)
3 tbsp tahini
1/4 c. water

Method
1. In a small microwave safe bowl, heat the oil on high power for 30 seconds. Add the garlic (be careful handling the bowl, it may get very hot), and microwave for 20 seconds more. Allow to cool for at least 1 minute.

2. Add the balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, and tahini to the oil and garlic. Stir together, the tahini will initially seize up and become stiff, continue stirring until the mixture is smooth. Add 2 tbsp of water and stir until smooth again. Add the remaining 2 tbsp of water if needed (this will depend upon your preferred dressing consistency).

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Add to salad and enjoy!

This dressing will keep in the fridge for several days, you may need to thin it out with a little more water or olive oil if it stiffens up after refrigeration.